Golf Cart Tire Pressure: 2022 Quick Reference Guide

Like any tire, golf cart tire pressure is important for keeping your cart in shape and getting you where you need to go.

Typically, the tire pressure will fall between 15 to 25 PSI for a golf cart. We recommend you fill the tires right in the middle of the range. So, typically, most carts run at about 20 to22 PSI.

One of the best ways to keep your golf cart in tip-top condition is to make sure its tires are in good working condition. Below, we have some frequently asked questions and tips for you to follow to make sure your golf cart keeps on rolling and stays warm!!

What is optimal tire pressure for my golf cart?

Optimal tire pressure for your golf cart will vary by make and model. You can find the recommended tire pressure (known as PSI) by looking on the tire’s sidewall.

Also, most golf cart manuals have a golf cart tire pressure chart to show you what the pressure should be for each type of tire you choose.

Typically, the tire pressure will fall between 15-25 PSI for a golf cart. We recommend that you fill the tires, right in the middle of the range. So, typically, most carts run at about 20-22 PSI.

If the tire pressure is too low, the sides of your tire will wear faster, however, lower air pressure does provide for a smooth, less bumpy ride. Also, if the tire pressure is too low, the motor and battery has to work harder, so it’s wearing down more than just the tires! If you’re looking to make your golf cart go faster, you’ll also want to keep these inflated properly.

On the flip side, high tire pressure will wear the middle of your tire down more quickly and the ride will be very bumpy, as it compromises the traction of the car. And an even bigger issue: if a golf care tire is too highly inflated, it can explode, which is very dangerous and could cause serious injury.

This is why we recommend you look at the recommended PSI range and go with a tire pressure right in the middle.

What kind of tire is best for my cart?

There are many, many golf cart tire brands, but some of the most reputable brands include Kenda, Deestone, Nanco Tires, Carlisle Tires and Greenball Tires. That being said, when it comes to golf cart tires, it is less about brand and more about the tread! There are three main kinds of treads: all-terrain, off-road/knobby, and turf/street. Let’s break down the treads:

  • All Terrain Tires: For those who use their carts solely for off-road or street use, these tires are the most popular. However, let’s be clear: you cannot use these tires on a golf course. The tread is far deeper than the tread on turf tires (the tires that come standard on most traditional golf carts), but they are more shallow than those you’ll see on off-road tires.
  • Off-road/Knobby: These tires look very similar to what you’d find on an all-terrain vehicle, with a very chunky, deep tread. These are great tires if you’re using your cart in a heavily wooded area or if the terrain is unstable, like mud, sand or even a small puddle of water. But, they wouldn’t be good for use on the street; they would wear down very quickly on the pavement.

    They also would absolutely not be allowed on a golf course, not to mention that riding on a cart with off-road tread would make for a very bumpy, unstable ride. Your clubs would be all over the place! These tires are best used by farmers or sportsmen on rural properties, in the woods or on a farm. If you’re buying a used golf cart, this is a great upgrade to improve your cart.
  • Turf/Street: These are the most common type of golf cart tires, as they usually come standard on most models. They have a shallow tread, perfect for use on the golf course or just driving up and down the streets of your neighborhood. If you plan on using your cart at the golf course, on the street or driving over well-kept grass, these tires would be suitable for you to use.

What sizes do golf cart tires come in?

Typically, most golf carts come with tires that are between 8-10 inches, though some people prefer a 12 inch tire. That being said, if you choose a 12 inch tire, you’ll likely need modifications to the wheel well of your cart or lifts to get them to fit.

Should I rotate my golf cart tires?

Just like you’d rotate the tires on your own car, you should rotate the tires on your golf cart. How often you do so will depend on how often you drive your cart.

Even wear on your tires will increase the lifespan of your tires. A lot of wear on your golf cart tires is due to the weight difference between the front and the back of the cart (usually the front of the cart is heavier from passenger weight). This will help with how smoothly the cart rides.

When my cart needs a replacement, should I buy new or used?

While you likely can get some very gently used golf cart tires, its always best to buy new. Many people think that because you put fewer miles on a golf cart, that used is a better option. However, many new tires come with a warranty, and for the best performance and longevity of your tires, buying new is going to be your best bet.

Can you fix a flat on a golf cart?

Yes, absolutely! It is a good idea to keep a can of tire repair sealant in your cart so that you’re prepared in case of an emergency. The best thing to do once you get a flat is to use something like “Fix-a-flat” and then take the tire in to a local tire store or autobody to see if it can be repaired.

You do not want to be in the middle of a golf course or out in the woods with a slow leak to your tire!
What else can I do to increase the life of my tires?

For starters, avoid potholes and curb hopping. Even if you have an aggressive tire, you’ll want to stay away from these hazards that can ruin your tire in just a few seconds.

Plus, they can knock your cart out of alignment, which we know ultimately leads to more wear and tear on the tire. Speaking of, check the alignment of your tires, and check them often. If the tires are slanting even slightly inward or slightly outward, they’re getting unnecessary wear and should be re-aligned.

It’s an easy fix and will save you hundreds of dollars in replacement tires in the future. And finally, break out your shoe polish! And no, it’s not to keep your shoes clean. Rubbing a shoe protectant on the outsides of your tires keeps them shielding from the harm done by the sun’s ultraviolet rays!

We hope these tips are a good reminder that tire maintenance on your golf cart leads to better performance and longevity of your vehicle. A little care and upkeep will keep you out of an emergency situation and will help you enjoy your beautiful golf cart for years to come!

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4 thoughts on “Golf Cart Tire Pressure: 2022 Quick Reference Guide”

  1. you recommend 15 to 25 psi for golf cart tires
    my cart has 205/65-10 tires which is rated for 35psi– which is correct
    cart does ride harsh and perhaps a lower psi would help

  2. william

    what is proper psi for 205/65-10 golf cart tires
    I see mention of20 to 25psi for golf carts yet the 205/65-10 is rated for 35psi
    what psi would result in a smoother ride

  3. My tire reads that 35 psi is a max pressure to seat the bead. It is not the running pressure.

  4. Stephen Mosher

    Should you treat radial tires on golf carts differently? Pressure and rotational frequency.

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